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are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference. they have the same tools we all have to communicate in a
is my question. sooner?'t we do it in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able to issue them. if i may continue,
about the u.s. investment climate and the government policy on attracting foreign investment, some of those policies include immigration, the debt ceiling, and energy. it is moderated. [applause] >> good morning everyone. lou, thank you -- lew, thank you for your excellent remarks. thank you to both of them for their leadership. it has been outstanding for the subject matter we have before us these next few days. their insights as it applies to the business community are very valuable to all of us that are joining us today. we are off to a great start to what promises to be a gay -- great conference and agenda. thank you to all who has come great distances to be with us today. i am very pleased to announce our first panel that is entitled usa?hy select the perspectives on operating in the united states." this'll be a very informative and invaluable discussion. it is also my pleasure to introduce that moderator of this panel, an important member of president obama's white house team, valerie jarrett. a senior adviser to the president and a longtime confidant of the president. she ov
policy on attracting foreign investment, some of those policies include immigration, the debt ceiling, and energy. it is moderated. [applause]
an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the united states. therefore i have determined that it is necessary to continue the national emergency declared with respect to sudan and maintain and enforce the sanctions against sudan to respond to this threat. signed, barack obama, the white house, october 30, 2013. the speaker pro tempore: the message will be referred to the committee on foreign affairs and ordered printed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. gohmert: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today, it adjourn to meet at 10:00 a.m. on friday, november 1, 2013, unless it has received a message from the senate transmitting its concurrence in the house concurrent resolution 62, in which case the house shall stand adjourned pursuant to that concurrent resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. gohmert: pursuant to the order of the house today, mr. speaker, i move that the house do now hereby adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjo
or public in on the senate foreign relations committee said today that he is embarrassed by the obama administration's policy on syria and a lack of support to the syrian opposition. bob corker was addressing the ambassador to syria at this hearing. it includes an update on efforts to transfer syria's chemical weapons to international control. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> this hearing of the senate foreign relations on syria will come to order. we have two panels today. first panel is robert ford, ambassador to syria, the assistant administrator for the bureau of democracy atu assistant for international security and nonproliferation. our second panel we will have alabaster -- an ambassador for the center of the atlantic council. we welcome you all. i look forward in this hearing to hear your respective on the realities we face in syria, the state of play, the progress we have made, and where we go from here strategically, especially given the catastrophic human a tearing crisis that is spreading a
name it. like many institutions of higher education, a high number of the students there are foreign national whors studying under student visas. under our current immigration policy, mr. speaker, our state, our public state institutions, we provide this world class education for people that feel a need in the economy. they're going to be great engineers, great mathematicians, great computer scientists. they graduate with a masters, a ph.d., what do we tell them? go back to another country and compete against us. compete against us. we're telling them to compete against us. how does that make sense, mr. speaker? what we need to do is provide a way, and the senate bill and h.r. 15 do this, where people with advanced degrees in these fields are able to stay here. today's companies don't care where the jobs are. you can be a computer programmer in india. you can be a computer programmer in france. you can be a computer programmer here. out of convenience we'd rather have you here but the job is going to follow you. the job is going to follow you, not the other way around. in addition, i
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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